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What data do smartwatches collect? What can you track with your smartwatch?

What data do smartwatches collect? Smartwatches are becoming increasingly popular, but there is a lot of concern about the data they collect.

There are a lot of concerns about the data that smartwatches collect. Some people worry that these devices are collecting too much information, while others are concerned about how this data will be used in the future.

We believe that it’s important to be aware of what data smartwatches are collecting and how it’s being used. That’s why we’ve created this guide and with just 5 minutes reading this artical by Edon Lazaj, you will understand what information your watch is tracking and what you can do to protect your privacy.

What data do smartwatches collect? What can you track with your smartwatch?
What data do smartwatches collect? What can you track with your smartwatch?

Potential security problems of smartwatches

Potential security problems of smartwatches
Potential security problems of smartwatches

Risks of your smartwatch

Risks of your smartwatch
Risks of your smartwatch

It’s no secret that our devices are collecting more and more data about us. Smartphones know where we are, what apps we use, who we talk to and more. But as wearable technology becomes more popular – with an estimated 125 million shipments of smartwatches and fitness trackers in 2019 alone – it’s important to understand what data these devices are collecting, how that data is being used and whether or not our information is secure.

Specific vulnerabilities of smartwatch to consider

Specific vulnerabilities of smartwatch to consider
Specific vulnerabilities of smartwatch to consider

Personal data collection

Smart watches collect a lot of information about you. This includes your location, which apps you use, who you talk to and more. This data is then sent to the watch’s manufacturer, who may sell it to third parties or use it for targeted advertising.

There have been several instances where this data has been used without the user’s knowledge or consent. In one case, a fitness tracker was used to track the whereabouts of military personnel. In another, a smartwatch was used to eavesdrop on conversations.

The possibilities that your data is sent to third parties

When you use a smartwatch, your data is often sent to many third parties, including the watch’s manufacturer, app developers, service providers and advertisers. This raises the risk that your data could be accessed and used without your knowledge or consent.

In one case, it was found that a popular fitness tracker was sending user data to over 150 different third parties. This included sensitive information such as heart rate and GPS data.

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Some smartwatches are vulnerable to hacking

Like any other device that is connected to the internet, smartwatches are vulnerable to hacking. If a hacker gains access to your watch, they could view your personal data, eavesdrop on your conversations or even track your location.

There have been several instances of smartwatch hacking, including one case where hackers gained access to a woman’s smartwatch and used it to spy on her.

Vulnerabilities on business networks

Smart watches can also create vulnerabilities on business networks. If an employee connects their watch to the network, it could provide hackers with a way in. This could lead to data breaches, identity theft and other cyber crimes.

A recent study found that over 60% of smartwatch users connect their devices to corporate networks. This raises the risk of data breaches and other cyber attacks.

What can you track With Wearables

What can you track With Wearables
What can you track With Wearables

Fitness

Fitness trackers and smartwatches are capable of collecting a lot of data about your daily activities. This includes how many steps you take, how many calories you burn, your heart rate, your sleep patterns and more.

Steps

This one’s probably familiar to you, as pretty much any activity-tracking device includes step tracking. Most fitness trackers and smartwatches use an accelerometer to measure your steps. This is a device that measures acceleration, or the rate of change in your speed.

Calories burned

This is another commonly tracked metric. Most fitness trackers and smartwatches use an estimate of your basal metabolic rate (BMR) to calculate the number of calories you’ve burned throughout the day. BMR is the amount of energy your body burns at rest and is affected by factors such as your age, weight and gender.

The next data is your heart rate.

Heart rate

Heart rate tracking has become a standard feature on fitness trackers and smartwatches. Your heart rate can give you valuable insights into your fitness level and how hard you’re working out. It can also help you detect health problems such as arrhythmias.

Sleep

Many fitness trackers and smartwatches include sleep tracking features. These can track how long you sleep, how often you wake up and the quality of your sleep. This data can be very valuable in understanding your overall health and well-being.

Workouts

If you’re using a fitness tracker or smartwatch to track your workouts, it will likely collect data such as the duration, intensity and type of workout. This data can be very helpful in understanding your fitness level and progress over time.

Distance Traveled

This is another common metric that is tracked by fitness trackers and smartwatches. The distance you travel can give you insights into your activity level and how much you’re moving around.

Active minutes

Active minutes is a metric that measures the amount of time you spend being active. This includes any movement that gets your heart rate up, such as walking, running, biking or swimming. Active minutes can be a good way to measure your overall activity level.

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Floors climbed

This metric is often included on fitness trackers and smartwatches with built-in altimeters. The altimeter measures the altitude of your current location. This data can be used to estimate the number of floors you’ve climbed during the day.

Specific Exercises

Many fitness trackers and smartwatches include features that allow you to track specific exercises. This data can be very helpful in understanding your progress and areas for improvement.

The way physicians might use the data from your smartwatch

There are a number of ways that physicians might use the data collected by smartwatches and other wearable devices.

One way is to use the data to track a patient’s health over time. This could be useful in detecting trends or changes in health status.

Another way is to use the data to diagnose and treat patients. For example, if a patient’s smartwatch data showed an irregular heart rate, a physician could use this information to diagnose and treat an underlying condition.

Finally, physicians could use the data to research new treatments and therapies. For example, if data from smartwatches showed that certain exercises improved sleep quality, this could lead to new treatments for sleep disorders.

Collection and Processing of Data from smartwatch in different and Multiple-User Scenarios

Collection and Processing of Data from smartwatch in different and Multiple-User Scenarios
Collection and Processing of Data from smartwatch in different and Multiple-User Scenarios

Wrist-worn devices are becoming more and more popular as they offer a convenient way to unobtrusively collect data about the wearer’s activity. However, these devices are often used in heterogeneous and multiple-user scenarios, which raises challenges in terms of data collection and processing.

In a heterogeneous scenario, the same device is worn by different users with different characteristics (e.g., age, gender, height, weight). This can lead to inaccurate data if the device is not properly calibrated for each user.

In a multiple-user scenario, multiple devices are worn by the same user (e.g., two smartwatches, one on each wrist). This can lead to duplicate data being collected if the devices are not properly synchronized.

Both of these scenarios can be challenging for data collection and processing. However, there are a few things that can be done to mitigate these challenges:

  1. Use data from multiple sources: In a heterogeneous scenario, data from multiple users can be used to improve accuracy. In a multiple-user scenario, data from multiple devices can be used to reduce duplication.
  2. Use algorithms to process raw data: Algorithms can be used to process raw data from wrist-worn devices to remove inaccuracies and duplicates.
  3. Use validated datasets: When possible, use datasets that have been collected and processed using the methods described above. This will ensure that the data is of high quality.
  4. Use data from multiple days: In a heterogeneous scenario, data from multiple days can be used to improve accuracy. In a multiple-user scenario, data from multiple days can be used to reduce duplication.
  5. Use summary statistics: In a heterogeneous scenario, summary statistics (e.g., mean, median, mode) can be used to improve accuracy. In a multiple-user scenario, summary statistics can be used to reduce duplication.
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By using data from multiple sources and applying algorithms to process the raw data, it is possible to collect accurate data in heterogeneous and multiple-user scenarios.

How to protect yourself from smartwatch risks

How to protect yourself from smartwatch risks
How to protect yourself from smartwatch risks

There are several steps you can take to protect yourself from the risks associated with smartwatches.

First, be aware of what data your watch is collecting and how it is being used. If you’re not comfortable with the way your data is being handled, consider opting out of certain features or deleting the app altogether.

Second, consider the security of your watch. Many smartwatches are connected to the internet and use Bluetooth to communicate with other devices. This makes them susceptible to hacking and malicious software. Be sure to only connect your watch to trusted devices and networks, and keep your software up to date to reduce the risk of attack.

Finally, remember that smartwatches are personal devices that can contain sensitive information. Be sure to keep your watch in a safe place where it won’t be lost or stolen.

By taking these precautions, you can help protect yourself from the risks associated with smartwatches.

F.A.Q What data do smartwatches collect

What data does wearable technology collect?

Wearable technology, such as fitness trackers and smartwatches, can collect a variety of data about the wearer. This data can include:

  • Heart rate
  • Blood pressure
  • Activity level
  • Sleep patterns
  • Location

Some wearable devices also have the ability to collect other types of data, such as how often the wearer uses their phone or what they say throughout the day. However, this type of data is typically only collected if the wearer opts in to this feature.

What does a smart watch track?

Most smartwatches collect data about the wearer’s activity level, heart rate, and sleep patterns. Some smartwatches also have the ability to track location.

Does smartwatch steal data?

Smartwatches are not typically known for stealing data. However, as with any device that is connected to the internet and collects personal data, there is always the potential for data to be stolen or leaked.

Can smart watch store data?

Yes, smartwatches can store data. Most smartwatches have the ability to store data locally on the device, as well as in the cloud.

Conclusion

Smartwatches are becoming more popular, and as the technology advances, they are collecting more data. This data can be used to improve our lives in a number of ways. However, we need to be aware of how this data is being collected and used. Leave your questions in the comment section below, and we will do our best to answer them.

Edon Lazaj

Graduate from UMass Boston with a 3.4 technical GPA. Experienced in the IT field looking to pursue a career within Cyber Security. Be a Bright Content Creator at Digitalne.tv

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